Last edited by Arashilar
Tuesday, August 11, 2020 | History

2 edition of state of the British sugar-colony trade found in the catalog.

state of the British sugar-colony trade

Massie, J.

state of the British sugar-colony trade

shewing that an additional duty of twelve shillings per 112 pounds weight may be laid upon brown or muscovado sugar (and proportionably higher duties upon sugar refined before imported) without making sugar dearer in this kingdom than it hath been of late years, and without distressing the British sugar-planters ...

by Massie, J.

  • 114 Want to read
  • 10 Currently reading

Published by Printed for T. Payne ..., sold by W. Shropshire ... W. Owen ... C. Henderson ... in London .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Great Britain.
    • Subjects:
    • Sugar trade -- Great Britain.,
    • Tariff on sugar -- Great Britain.

    • Edition Notes

      Statementmost humbly submitted to the consideration of the Honourable House of Commons by J. Massie.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHF2651.S843 M3
      The Physical Object
      Pagination[2], 40, [2]+ ;
      Number of Pages40
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL241569M
      LC Control Numberca 17003505

      French and British Activities in Africa from the s to 's "Encyclopedia of World History", other reference books such as Whitaker's Almanack and The Statesman's Year Book, “The Last Two Million Years" into a single state. There were also many traders, engaging particularly in the trans-. ~ CE. Advanced sugar presses were developed, doubling the amount of juice that was obtained from the sugar cane. 11 – CE. Sugar was cultivated for large-scale refinement for the first time in Madeira; by the end of this period, about 70 ships were involved in the Madeira sugar trade, and refining and distribution were based in Antwerp. 12,

      The repeal of the Navigation laws was the result of a profoundly selfish calculation of the British Free-Trade school, that the commercial supremacy of England was so decided as to compel. The history of the modern state of Singapore dates back to its founding in the early nineteenth century, but evidence suggests that a significant trading settlement existed in the Island of Singapore in the 14th century. At the time, the Kingdom of Singapura was under the rule of Parameswara, who killed the previous ruler before he was expelled by the Majapahit or the Siamese.

        The British colonies were a part of the trade business in Britain as resources from the said states were sent to London for trade, and goods from Britain were imported. Slavery was widespread during the colonial period, and it was widely practiced in the 13 states. These changes could be seen as early as the period of apprenticeship, which lasted in the British colonies from until and The ’s saw the gradual evolution of emancipation sweep across the islands of the Caribbean even before it reached the United States.


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State of the British sugar-colony trade by Massie, J. Download PDF EPUB FB2

This book is a monumental one in the historiography of the British colonies in the Caribbean. Dunn describes the development of the planter sugar class in the seventeenth century.

While some specifics of his arguments have been contested by more recent historians, the main arguments of this book still hold today.

flag Like see review/5. A state of the British sugar-colony trade: Shewing, that an additional duty of twelve shillings per pounds weight may be laid upon brown or muscovado sugar (and proportionably higher duties upon sugar refined before imported) without making sugar dearer in this kingdom than it hath been of late years, and without distressing the British sugar-planters ; for their profits will then be twice as much.

The book explores the hidden stories behind this sweet product, revealing how powerful American interests deposed Queen Lili'uokalani of Hawaii, how Hitler tried to ensure a steady supply of beet sugar when enemies threatened to cut off Germany's supply of overseas cane sugar, and how South Africa established a domestic ethanol industry in the wake of anti-apartheid sugar by: The growth of trade was by no means steady and was frequently disrupted by war, but it accelerated distinctly over the course of the century; the annual level of trade rose by percent beforeby percent between andand by percent by:   This book was a really interesting history of Barbados, but more importantly it is a history of how life was in Britain before the Carribean was settled, how and why the slave trade began, how that affected the indeginoius population, how the Carribean islands were intially settled and tamed by the Europeans (for example I for the first time Cited by:   The British and other Europeans who went out to the West Indies to get rich usually died first.

The climate and the mosquito-infested swamps, combined with consuming copious quantities of rum. 10 books based on 1 votes: The Sugar Barons: Family, Corruption, Empire, and War in the West Indies by Matthew Parker, The Black Jacobins: Toussaint L'Ou.

to cash in on the vast potential for trade and agriculture In the region. the dominant European nations of the period all raced to establish American colonies.

and. by the seventeenth century. sugar cane had become almost eKciusively a "New World" crop. Denmark and the West Indies. Before their purchase by the Umted States. the. British merchants and bankers lived in Cuba and helped finance the trade. British consuls, or their families, even owned slaves.

Similarly, Brazilian mines and plantations that relied on slave labor were financed by British capital. ByBritish imports from. Sugar, or White Gold, as British colonists called it, was the engine of the slave trade that brought millions of Africans to the Americas beginning in the early 16th-century.

In the heyday of the British slave trade, from toWest Indians (as white sugar barons were then known) became conspicuous by their new wealth.

The book. If the abolition of British Caribbean slavery was a long, drawn-out affair, the demise of the British Caribbean sugar industry was an even slower process. It muddled through the aftermath of the free trade acts of the middle of the nineteenth century and adopted a series of desperate ad hoc measures to keep itself afloat throughout the.

The Slave Trade, Sugar, and British Economic Growth, That from the encreasing luxury of our Country [i.e. Britain], the advance of the sugar keeps pace with the advance upon the Slaves.1 British overseas trade grew substantially during the eighteenth century.

Data derived from customs records indicate that the. monopolistic trading position. Later it was felt that a regime of free trade would make India a major market for British goods and a source of raw materials, but British capitalists who invested in India, or who sold banking or shipping service there, continued effectively to enjoy monopolistic privileges.

The Sugar Act of levied taxes on imports to British colonies in North America. In doing so, the act marked a change in British colonial policy—an empire-shaking change—from commercial and trade regulation only, to taxation by Parliament.

There was an earlier Sugar Act that established a foundation for the act of Sugar Act, in U.S. colonial history, British legislation () aimed at ending the smuggling trade in sugar and molasses from the French and Dutch West Indies and at providing increased revenues to fund enlarged British Empire responsibilities following the French.

The book ends, then, with an account of social and economic forces, but invoked not to explain how sugar helped to make global capitalism, but to scold its most vulnerable victims. • Sugar is. The sugar trade Sugar cane development in the Americas.

The Portuguese introduced sugar plantations in the s off the coast of their Brazilian settlement colony, located on the island Sao Vincente. As the Portuguese and Spanish maintained a strong colonial presence in the Caribbean, the Iberian Peninsula amassed tremendous wealth from the cultivation of this cash crop.

Search the world's most comprehensive index of full-text books. My library. One of the leading causes of the war of were the trade restrictions that were imposed on the United States by Great Britain.

The British wanted to restrict American trade with France, due to their ongoing war with France. The United States considered these restrictions illegal under international law.

the British consumer had to pay more for his sugar than he would have under free trade. Also the West Indian colonies became objects of international rivalry and brought large expenditures on defence.

These points were first made in a coherent way by Adam Smith, and his economic indictment of the British .Thesis statement: The problems that the sugar industry faced led to immense problems in the British West Indies.

This essay examines the problems in which the sugar industry faced during the period of The Planter’s in the British West Indies Acquired Large sums of money from the ever rowing and popular sugar industry.

Tea Tuesdays: How Tea + Sugar Reshaped The British Empire: The Salt When tea met sugar, they formed a power couple that altered the course of history. It .